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How to Find Your Raw Data on 23andme.com and Identify MTHFR Polymorphisms

In this article, I’ll review what MTHFR polymorphisms are, how to figure out if you have one of these polymorphisms, and where to learn more about what you can do if you have a polymorphism that impacts MTHFR enzyme activity.

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

First, let’s define MTHFR:

MTHFR = Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase.

MTHFR is an enzyme that breaks down the amino acid homocysteine.

23andme.com will sell you a kit to decode your DNA. Once you purchase (use this link to buy one from Amazon) and complete the procedure, you can look at your MTHFR results easily.

From the 23andme blog:

“Here’s what we know about MTHFR.

The MTHFR gene contains instructions for making an enzyme that’s important for metabolizing folate (also called folic acid or vitamin B9). MTHFR also helps our cells recycle homocysteine, a chemical in the blood, into methionine, a building block for proteins.[1]

We also know that there are two common naturally occurring variants in the MTHFR gene, called C677T and A1298C.

When the MTHFR gene has either of these two variants, the resulting MTHFR enzyme is slightly less active, and this can lead to decreased levels of folate and increased levels of homocysteine in the blood.

Its worth repeating:

We also know that there are two common naturally occurring variants in the MTHFR gene, called C677T and A1298C.

When the MTHFR gene has either of these two variants, the resulting MTHFR enzyme is slightly less active, and this can lead to decreased levels of folate and increased levels of homocysteine in the blood.

So go buy one, and then come back here to interpret results. It’s easy.

Step 1: Navigate to 23andme.com

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Step 2: Authenticate

I’m still upset with myself that I authenticated with Google. If I had to do it again, I’d just create my own secure password.

Now my genetic signature is being cross-referenced with my search habits by a data science team at Google. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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Step 3: Toggle Menu and Click “Browse Raw Data”

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Step 4: Search For rs1801131

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Focus on “Your Genotype” to see your Genetic variant.

Step 5: Interpret Genetic Variation for rs1801131

xcode.life says that GG and GT mutations for rs1801131 will result in a reduction in the MTHFR enzyme activity:

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Step 6: Search For rs1801133

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Focus on “Your Genotype” to see your Genetic variant.

Step 7: Interpret Genetic Variation for rs1801133

xcode.life says that AA and AG mutations for rs1801133 will result in a reduction in the MTHFR enzyme activity:

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They are a little more specific with how much enzymatic activity is affected. AA being somewhat worse off than AG.

Step 8: What to do next?

Personally, I have the GT variant for rs1801131, and the GG variant for rs1801133, so I’m only impacted by the polymorphism on rs1801131.

Nonetheless, I get a real kick from a good folate-containing b-vitamin. You might too, if you have one of these polymorphisms.

Be careful with supplementing because you might get yourself into trouble. For example, folic acid is something you’ll want to avoid, but it’s easy to get confused staring at a supplement label.

To get past this hurdle, I’d recommend speaking with an expert, or finding a relevant blog/podcast from a trusted source.

I personally trust Dr. Rhonda Patrick, a frequent guest of the Joe Rogan Experience Podcast, and she has this to say about MTHFR polymorphisms here. In this interview, she mentions that:

“Hundreds of genes interact with micro-nutrients and macro-nutrients that we take in. For example, half the population has a polymorphism that changes the way your body metabolizes folate and folic acid, the oxidized form of folate.

Folate helps us make methyl groups, which are used for various biological functions. The MTHFR gene helps with that process, so people with a genetic polymorphism need to take a methyl folate 5 supplement.”

She mentions a methyl folate 5 supplement, which you can find on Amazon here. I like Thorne and Jarrow Formulas, but of course you’ll have your own preference based on price and brands you already trust.

Dr. Ben Lynch is another expert to learn from. He is very much devoted to MTHFR polymorphisms and helping people with health issues related to MTHFR enzyme activity reduction.

His website is here, and his book is available on Amazon here. I would be thrilled if you used this link to shop for his book on Amazon, because I’ll earn a small affiliate kickback.

Thanks for reading. I hope you learned something useful!

Written by

Documentation and tutorials on Python, Programming, and Data Analysis. FPL Addict. Occasionally writing about biohacking, PMing, and food.

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